PRESS & NEWS

Dr. Nabors listed among top dentists for 2010

Nashville Lifestyles

In October 2010, Nashville Lifestyles magazine highlighted Dr. Nabors in its Nashville “Top Dentists”. We are pleased to be included with “some of the biggest names behind some of the brightest smiles in Music City.” Here‘s an excerpt from the article:

“Who am I? I think in today‘s world it‘s important to know who you trust your oral health care with. I ‘m a small business owner, not a large corporation or group practice….

“I think personal responsibly is more important today than it has ever been. The goal of our team is to provide every patient with the best dental experience possible. I am fortunate to have one of the best teams in dentistry. We don‘t just say that, we earn that through continuing education, practice analysis by our patients, and proven credentials….

“We see some of Nashville ‘s top athletes, politicians, artists and entertainers. But, we don‘t do what we do to be on the latest ‘who’s who’ list. We strive to earn the respect of each and every patient. I love cosmetic dentistry. However, I gain as much enjoyment by looking past the appearance and focusing on the individual. Maintaining a healthy mouth is imperative to complete health.

“Oral health is now more important than ever. There are relationships between heart disease, cancer, diabetes and many others that are directly linked to gum disease and oral infections. When we evaluate a client‘s aesthetic goals, we also include ways to insure that we are not just getting a more beautiful smile, but a healthier one as well.”


Dr. Nabors voted one of 2009’s Nashville “Best Dentist”

Nashville Scene Readers’ Poll

Dr. Thomas Nabors included in the 2009 Nashville “Best Dentist” category.


DNA Testing for Oral Bacteria

WTVF News

2007 feature story about Dr. Nabors and the cutting edge DNA testing he provides for his patients which detects oral bacteria that is linked to diseases such as heart disease, pre-term birth, stroke, diabetes, and eclampsia.


DNA Testing for Periodontal Pathogens-A New Paradigm

Inside Dental Hygiene

April 2006 article written by one of Dr. Nabor’s clinical team members, Victoria Richards, BSDH (Registered Dental Hygienist/Periodontal Therapist, 2006 President of the Tennessee Dental Hygiene Association)


Give Back A Smile

WSMV News

2006 feature story about the charitable work Dr. Nabors has done for Give Back A Smile, an organization that provides free cosmetic dentistry to victims of domestic violence.


Dr. Thomas Nabors Wins Best of Show in the 11th Annual AACD National Smile Gallery Competition (2005)

American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry

Madison, WI – Thomas Nabors, DDS, of Nashville, TN, has won Best of Show in the 11th Annual American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD) National Smile Gallery competition, sponsored by Americus Dental Labs, Inc., for exhibiting outstanding skill in cosmetic dental procedures. Dr. Nabor’s work was selected at the organization’s 21st Annual Scientific Session in Nashville, Tennessee.

“I am delighted to carry on the AACD’s tradition of superior smile design and changing people’s lives through cosmetic dentistry,” commented Dr. Nabors.

The Annual AACD Smile Gallery Competition awards winners in six categories based upon technical skill in cosmetic dentistry, including: Missing Anterior Tooth Restorations, Indirect Restorations, Direct Restorations, Single Unit Anterior or Posterior Esthetics, Portrait, and Special Effects. Additionally, awards of “Best of Show” and the People’s Choice Award are given to those cases that particularly stand out as premier casework in cosmetic dentistry. All entries are submitted anonymously by members of the AACD.

Dental professionals interested in submitting entries into the 12th Annual AACD Smile Gallery in San Diego, CA, should contact Carol Schwickrath at (800) 543-9220, or via e-mail at carols@aacd.com for information regarding contest criteria and specifics.

The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry is the largest international dental organization dedicated specifically to the art and science of cosmetic dentistry. Founded in 1984, the AACD has nearly 7000 members in the United States and more than 50 countries around the globe. Members of the Academy include cosmetic and reconstructive dentists, dental laboratory technicians, dental hygienists, dental assistants, educators, researchers, and students.

The AACD congratulates Dr. Nabors and all of the winners of the 2005 AACD Smile Gallery. These cosmetic dental professionals represent the essence of fine smile design and the upper echelon of the skilled members of the organization.


Dr. Thomas W. Nabors, III, DDS Achieves Accredited Status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry

American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry

Madison, WI Thomas W. Nabors, III, DDS, of Nashville, TN has achieved Accredited status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD) – joining just over 250 dental professionals in the world who have earned the prestigious designation. Dr. Nabors reached this status through a dedication to continuing education and careful adherence to clinical protocol.

“I am honored to become an Accredited member of the AACD. Through the challenges of the program, I have learned the keys to providing my patients with cosmetic dental services,” said Dr. Nabors.

Through the AACD’s advanced credentialing program for dentists and dental laboratory technicians, AACD members who wish to become Accredited must undergo a three-part process consisting of a written examination, submission of clinical cases for evaluation and an oral examination. Each candidate must also attend a series of workshops as part of the program. While each part must be completed in sequence, candidates have up to five years to complete the program after successfully completing the written examination.

The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry is the largest international dental organization committed to excellence in cosmetic dentistry. Founded in 1984, the AACD has over 7,600 members in the United States and more than 60 countries worldwide. Members of the Academy include cosmetic and reconstructive dentists, dental laboratory technicians, dental hygienists, dental assistants, educators, researchers and students.


Dentist to be in Ambrose mix

Nashville City Paper
By Don Mooradian, April 29, 2005

As more residents move into downtown Nashville, more personal services are sure to follow.

“I have believed in this trend, as well as the trend of many service businesses to locate downtown,” said Nashville dentist Tommy Nabors.

Nabors has had an office in the L&C Tower for the past two years but will be moving into a 3,100 square-foot office at the Ambrose Building at Fourth Avenue North and Church Street next week.

“I am one of only a handful of dentists who have bucked the suburb trend and chosen to provide health care to the working population of downtown, and now to the blooming residential population,” he said.

“I wanted to provide a state-of-the-art facility to complement the urban revitalization that is happening here,” he said.

Nabors said he loves the old building he is moving into and where his practice will have a contemporary look. He especially likes the skylights that have been installed in a portion of the 20-foot-plus ceiling that juts out from the rest of the building.


Urban Appeal

Nashville Lifestyles
By Bill Ditenhafer, November 2004

……Another good way to gauge the progress of a neighborhood – especially in an urban neighborhood, where keeping things within walking distance is crucial – is it’s level of residential services. Restaurants, bars and entertainment are expected perks of living downtown, and in fact have been there all along. Now, right in the city center the residential service industry is beginning to bloom as well, primed to attend to the needs of rapidly expanding population. Dr. Thomas Nabors, a dentist whose practice is located in the L&C Tower, says that, even on the 9th floor, he gets an impressive number of walk-in patients.

“When I wanted to break out and start my own practice, I knew that I wanted to buy one that already existed, and one of the few available was downtown,” recalls Nabors. “I balked at first, but then I decided to do it. And I’m glad I did.”

Nabors says more and more businesses of this type are locating downtown in anticipation of the influx of residents from the completion of buildings like the Viridian, the Lofts at the Exchange and others. After the proximity to restaurants and other entertainment venues, these are the types of businesses that make living downtown describable as convenient……


The Tennessean

by Kelli Samantha Hewett, Staff Writer

A national trend in dentistry has found its way to the Nashville area, making going to the dentist more like going to a spa or a Chuck E Cheese.
Before the drill, before the picking and prodding, patients now can get pedicures, hand and foot massages, play video games or with stuffed animals, watch big-screen TVs and listen to the tranquil sounds of chirping birds in the forest.

Area dentists said the new treatments are accessories to draw the estimated 36% of adults and children who don’t visit a dentist unless something is rotting, hurting or falling out.

It’s all done to de-stress what to many has been a hand-wringing and head-shaking experience.

”There’s none of the anxiety I had four or five years ago. I’m a different person,” said Seals, who has been going to Nashville dentist Thomas Nabors for her dental needs.

Nabors has banished the dental smell from his downtown high-rise. He opts for an aromatherapy oil diffuser that sends calming lavender floating through his office. Not to mention free professional tooth bleaching for new patients, stereo headphones, a minifridge with free water and munchies, along with warm blankets, massage pads and complimentary paraffin hand waxes for the regulars.

”The patients love it, but our primary goal is dentistry and taking care of people. The spa is more like an accessory,” said Nabors, who also owns an Aveda beauty and health spa in Birmingham, Ala.

Seals raves about the pampering, such as the moisturizing wax and heated mittens, which come with Nabors’ cleanings.

So what’s going on with the U.S. dental industry, with its once-signature white walls, tiny rooms and glaring tonsil lights?

Part of it is the desire to bring in new patients. The American Dental Association estimates that only 64% of Americans routinely get dental care. Dentists want to increase that number and reduce serious problems, often caused by neglect.

Cost is the top reason people don’t visit a dentist more often, ADA figures show, followed by a belief that routine visits aren’t really needed. Fear rounds out the top three answers.

Many dentists also want to update their images.

”In my office, everything is about the dental care. Part of that is making the patients more comfortable,” said Lorin Berland, a dentist who runs The Dental Spa in Dallas and says he was the first to coin the phrase in 1996, after hiring a massage therapist to reduce stress in patients.

”I think a lot of dentists are going overboard,” Berland said. ”A lot of people don’t like to be touched. They don’t like a lot of fuss and frills.”

Nabors and most other dentists don’t wield the warming wax, or hit the pressure points, though. Spa services are usually handled by assistants. Full-blown cosmetology treatments such as massages and facials require special licenses.

The American Dental Association hasn’t taken a position on dental spas, other than to emphasize complete and quality care that falls within their licensing.

The dentists who speak on behalf of the ADA offer different viewpoints.

”It’s in the hands of the consumer,” said Leslie Seldin, an ADA spokesman who practices in Manhattan.

Seldin said if patients think they will be more comfortable, it could be a good choice for them, but he said it’s probably not for everyone. And, personally, he prefers to stick strictly with teeth.

In Pacific Palisades, Calif., a husband-and-wife dentist team has launched what they call the first chain of dental spas, called Dental Spa Center, with offices in New York, California, Michigan and Korea.

The approach has tripled the number of new patients, said co-owner Lynn Watanabe.

”It’s not like a fad,” Watanabe said. ”It’s going to be something that’s here to stay.”